Sunday, January 9, 2011

Lesbians, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis - The Second Wave - By Judith Glassgold, and Suzanne Iasenza. 2004

Get a feminist perspective on important changes in psychoanalysis!

Lesbians, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis: The Second Wave examines recent changes in psychoanalysis that have opened the door for new perspectives on same-sex desire. Authors from a variety of disciplines and theoretical orientations combine feminism with psychoanalytic and postmodern theories to celebrate diversity in gender and sexual experience. This collection of lesbian-affirmative writings addresses transference and countertransference, gender subjectivities, privilege and racism, therapist homophobia, and violence in lesbian relationships.

In the past decade, psychoanalysis has undergone changes in clinical theory that have led to views on human sexuality that are less focused on what is “normal” and therapy practices that resist attempts to fit individuals into prescribed developmental models. Lesbians, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis presents a variety of backgrounds (psychiatry, psychology, and social work), analytic training (formal institute training, study groups, supervision), and theoretical perspectives (self-psychology, object relations, relational psychoanalysis, feminist theory, queer theory, postmodernism, Lacanian theory) unified by the healing power of psychoanalytically informed theory and practice.

The book is divided into three sections—“Community: Personal and Political,” “Ongoing Clinical Issues,” and “New Thinking on Sexuality and Gender,” addressing lesbian tomboy development, the queering of relational psychoanalysis, how attachment theory and intersubjectivity can contribute to newer gender theory, and including:
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Judith Glassgold Psy.D.

GSAPP, Rutgers University
Research Interests and Clinical Work:
Sexual Orientation & LGBT issues
Psychotherapy & Gender
Professional Ethics
Social Action & Psychology

August 2009
The American Psychological Association (APA) 117th Annual Convention was held on August 6th -9th. GSAPP faculty, alumni and students attended and participated in the convention which was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Faculty presenters included Nancy Boyd-Franklin, Linda Reddy and Judith Glassgold. Several GSAPP students and alumni also participated in the event.
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Banned! Psychologists rule telling gays to get therapy to make them straight is no longer acceptable
The Associated Press,
August 6, 2009 – NYDaily News
The American Psychological Association declared Wednesday that mental health professionals should not tell gay clients they can become straight through therapy or other treatments.
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Same-Sex Marriage: The Legal and Psychological Evolution in America
by Donald J. Cantor, Elizabeth Cantor, James C. Black, and Campbell D. Barrett. 2006

While other countries have recently legalized civil marriage for same-sex couples debates over such marriages continue in the U.S.  This timely book reviews the history of the evolution of same-sex marriage in the United States. With topics ranging from State Law regarding same-sex couples to legal adoption of children by lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals and couples this book provides a clear and even-handed treatment of the on-going struggle for equal rights to civil marriage by all people, regardless of the gender of partners.

Same-Sex Marriage: 
The Legal and Psychological Evolution in America 
by Donald J. Cantor, 
Elizabeth Cantor, 
James C. Black, and 
Campbell D. Barrett. 

Gay marriage isn't revolutionary. It's just next.
By Stephanie Coontz,
January 9, 2010 – The Washington Post

Opponents of same-sex marriage worry that allowing two men or two women to wed would radically transform a time-honored institution. But they're way too late on that front. Marriage has already been radically transformed - in a way that makes gay marriage not only inevitable, as Vice President Biden described it in an interview late last year, but also quite logical.

We are near the end of a two-stage revolution in the social understanding and legal definition of marriage. This revolution has overturned the most traditional functions of the institution: to reinforce differences in wealth and power and to establish distinct and unequal roles for men and women under the law.

For millennia, marriage was about property and power rather than love. Parents arranged their children's unions to expand the family labor force, gain well-connected in-laws and seal business deals. Sometimes, to consolidate inheritances, parents prevented their younger children from marrying at all. For many people, marriage was an unavoidable duty. For others, it was a privilege, not a right. Often, servants, slaves and paupers were forbidden to wed.

But a little more than two centuries ago, people began to believe that they had a right to choose their partners on the basis of love rather than having their marriages arranged to suit the interests of parents or the state.

Love, not money, became the main reason for getting married, and more liberal divorce laws logically followed. After all, people reasoned, if love is gone, why persist in the marriage? Divorce rates rose steadily from the 1850s through the 1950s, long before the surge that initially accompanied the broad entry of women into the workforce…


Opponents of gay marriage argue that this trend will lead to the destruction of traditional marriage. But, for better and for worse, traditional marriage has already been destroyed, and the process began long before anyone even dreamed of legalizing same-sex marriage.

People now decide for themselves who and when - and whether - to marry. When they do wed, they decide for themselves whether to have children and how to divide household tasks. If they cannot agree, they are free to leave the marriage.

If gay marriage is legally recognized in this country, it will have little impact on the institution of marriage. In fact, the growing acceptance of same-sex marriage - an indication that it's not just the president's views that are "evolving" - is a symptom, rather than a cause, of the profound revolutions in marriage that have already taken place.
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Stephanie Coontz teaches family history at the Evergreen State College and is the author of "A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s."

Stephanie Coontz
History and Family Studies
The Evergreen State College

Director of Research and Public Education

Council on Contemporary Families

Premier's unholy row with Cardinal
by Troy Bramston,
January 9, 2011 - The Sunday Telegraph

PREMIER Kristina Keneally has lashed out at the head of her church in Australia, saying she was "saddened" by Cardinal George Pell for denouncing Catholic politicians who do not follow the church's teachings.

In an exclusive interview, Ms Keneally said Cardinal Pell risked being "interpreted as condemnatory and threatening" by urging MPs to stick to their religious convictions when making policy decisions on contentious social issues such as same-sex marriage.

Ms Keneally, a deeply committed Catholic with a Masters degree in religious studies, said: "I read those comments from the Archbishop and, if anything, they saddened me.

"Almost every Catholic politician I know takes their responsibility as an elected representative and their faith very seriously. Many have really struggled, as have I, when moral issues require us to vote - and particularly when it is a conscience vote."…

…Member for Lakemba Tony Stewart said: "I found those comments from Pell bizarre and straight from the 1950s.

"Trying to get politicians to vote in accordance to the Catholic Church is really to the detriment of what parliamentary representation is all about in Australia."

In a swipe at Cardinal Pell, suggesting he could be more helpful, Ms Keneally said: "Politicians of faith often would like to turn to religious leaders for pastoral advice and guidance, and sometimes that's not available."…
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Catholic Bishop Tobin lashes out at R.I. leaders for pushing gay marriage  
By Philip Marcelo,
January 8, 2011 – The Providence Journal

PROVIDENCE –– Roman Catholic Bishop Thomas J. Tobin lashed out at Governor Chafee and legislative leaders on Friday for trying to advance legislation that would legalize gay marriage in Rhode Island, suggesting that the state’s leaders should focus on job creation and the state’s economy.

But Chafee and House Speaker Gordon D. Fox, who is openly gay, reiterated their support for allowing same-sex couples to legally marry. Chafee repeated his argument that gay marriage, in his view, is an economic issue.

Tobin’s comments came Friday, the day after bills to legalize gay marriage were introduced again in the General Assembly. They represent the bishop’s second public rebuke of the new governor, who took office on Tuesday.
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Related links:

Despite outrage, little progress in church scandal
January 2, 2010, Duluth News Tribune
Gay Conversion | Religious Conversion - Transforms The Damned Into The Saved | COVERING - Kenji Yoshino – 2002 - The Yale Law Journal

"Covering: The Hidden Assault on our Civil Rights"
A conversation with author Kenji Yoshino about Yoshino's book.
April 20, 2006 – Charlie Rose
View video:

Groundbreaking Study Finds Family Acceptance of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Adolescents Protects Against Depression, Substance Abuse and Suicidal Behavior in Early Adulthood – by Caitlin Ryan, PhD, December 6, 2010 - FAMILY ACCEPTANCE PROJECT.
Institutionalized STRUCTURAL VIOLENCE – Vatican’s UNSUBSTANTIATED ANTIGAY TEACHINGS - severe harm lasting throughout a child’s lifetime | Benedict XVI & Hierarchy CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE COVER-UPS

SEXUAL ORIENTATION is less about sex and more about LOVE, being one with another human being - ATTACHMENT THEORY 
 “Auschwitz – Benedict XVI - Christmas 2008 - Brokeback Mountain” (NP) 
Nothing in life is more precious than the intimate relationships we have with love ones. Healthy love relationships delight us give us confidence to take on challenges and support us in difficult times. Photo

"Someday, maybe, there will exist a well-informed, well-considered, and yet fervent public conviction that the most deadly of all possible sins is the mutilation of a child's spirit." Erik Erikson

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